The Mask You do’n(o)t Live In?

There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. Galatians 3:28

Good Monday Morning to this week 45 of 2019

Recently I was made aware of the fact that I am a “white male”… . For most of my life
I’ve been “culturally-color-blind” and was trying to understand what the explicit mentioning of this title meant.  Where does this idea come from, is this an attempt to unveil or an attempt to cover over with a mask? I am quite sure you’ve had similar experiences due to an ethnic, gender or social peer group you’ve spent time in. Of course, I am aware of the privileges I’ve had growing up in a country (PNG) with few in this category. I do ask myself this morning, is this the right season to walk this line? Of course, I am a white male, not that it matters;  with slightly red hair and red skin (smile), not out of the middle class and spent most of my life caring for marginalized, so this mask feels estranged and hostile to say it mildly. Yes, I won’t put on this mask, not saying that those masks aren’t there or don’t continue causing so much harm, hurt and discrimination to many all over the world.

Galatians 3:28, represents a new construct of reality, opposing the dominating construct of Hellenistic-Roman society. Although Christians still had to live in this Hellenistic-Roman culture, they had a new mental context in their minds, which became the social context when they gathered for worship. Scholars pose the question as to whether Galatians 3:28 is indeed the great egalitarian text that it is often assumed to be.
It does as well address the issue of inheritance of Abraham’s promise, and against this background, one should indeed accept that no worldly distinctions have any bearing on the inheritance of the promise. Douglas A. Campbell distinguishes important aspects: He points out that the heart of the matter is “the uncompromising eschatological logic of Paul’s reconciling gospel and that this has universal abolitionistic consequences. Secondly, he argues that the binaries typical of Hellenistic social ideology could be detached from the Christological claims and may indeed be abolished itself.

Paul’s Christology thus underpins a (controversial) model of community in which Jew and Gentile enjoy unbounded table-fellowship, sharing one bread and one cup, demonstrating in concrete social interaction that they are “one body in Christ”.
Paul did not have the abolishment of human categories in mind. However, he wanted the relationship between people of different status to change – a claim that is best understood in terms of the metaphor of the building of family.

Alio Cissé Niang puts it nicely:
Paul the counterculturalist, acting with liberating passion for all people, emphasizing that all are God’s children, in spite of ethnicity, social status or gender, as Galatians 3:28 indicates. Paul viewed believers as a new ethnic group that had been created through participation in Christ, with all other norms being relativized. A theology of inclusiveness. The Church as a unique culture, while at the same time respecting the peculiarities and particularities of ethnic and cultural specificities with the emphasis on both unity and diversity.

Galatians 3:28 could indeed be an “open text”, interpreted in diverse ways, these approaches emphasizing the immense depth of this verse with the importance and implication of these momentous words. Could this verse be
The Magna Carta of Humanity?

Mary McLeod Bethune writes with impressive implication to her life:

With these words, the scales fell from my eyes and the light came flooding in. My sense of inferiority, my fear of handicaps, dropped away: “Whosoever”, it said. No Jew nor Gentile, no Catholic nor Protestant, no black nor white; just “whosoever”. It meant that I, a humble Negro girl, had just as much chance as anybody in the sight and love of God …

Wishing you a wonderful week as you keep embracing this verse unmasked, revealing the wonderful implications of this inclusiveness and knowing of new belonging.

Philemon

 

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