On our own, we conclude ….

Chapter 8

Good Monday Morning to this week 9 of 2020

Thinking and speaking about compassion and mercy I came across this passage from Walter Brueggemann speaking on generosity. I’ll leave you with this, as this week emerges out of the shadows:

Walter Brueggemann, 11.03.1933  an American Protestant Old Testament scholar and theologian.  He is known in modern progressive Christianity and argues that the Church must provide a counter-narrative to the dominant culture or forces of our time.

On Generosity

On our own, we conclude:
there is not enough to go around

we are going to run short
of money
of love
of grades
of publications
of members
of years
of life

we should seize the day
seize our goods
seize our neighbor’s goods
because there is not enough to go around

and in the midst of our perceived deficit
you come
you come giving bread in the wilderness
you come giving children at the 11th hour
you come giving homes to exiles
you come giving futures to the shut down
you come giving easter joy to the dead
you come – fleshed in Jesus.

and we watch while
the blind receive their sight
the lame walk
the lepers are cleansed
the deaf hear
the dead are raised
the poor dance and sing

we watch
and we take food we did not grow and
life we did not invent and
future that is gift and gift and gift and
families and neighbours who sustain us
when we did not deserve it.

It dawns on us – late rather than soon-
that you “give food in due season
you open your hand
and satisfy the desire of every living thing.”

By your giving, break our cycles of imagined scarcity
override our presumed deficits
quiet our anxieties of lack
transform our perceptual field to see
the abundance………mercy upon mercy
blessing upon blessing.

Sink your generosity deep into our lives
that your muchness may expose our false lack
that endlessly receiving we may endlessly give
so that the world may be made “Easter” new,
without greedy lack, but only wonder,
without coercive need but only love,
without destructive greed but only praise
without aggression and invasiveness….
all things “Easter” new…..
all around us, toward us and
by us, all things Easter new.

Finish your creation, in wonder, love and praise. Amen.”
Walter Brueggemann

Wishing you a week of abundance.

Philemon

 

The excited commotion and scramble

Chapter 7

Good Monday Morning to this week 8 of 2020

Zacchaeus, scrambled out of the tree, hardly believing his luck, delighted to take Jesus home. Luke 19.6 MSG

Scramble and commotion are related words, both very often used within the context of Israel and the teachings and parables of Jesus.

Scramble; to move somewhere quickly and in a way that is not graceful, to move something upwards, make one’s way quickly or awkwardly up a steep gradient or over rough ground by using one’s hands as well as one’s feet.

Commotion; a sudden, short period of noise, confusion, or excited movement

Other terms of seen: To be in haste, see the commotion, a growing disarray, the cluttered, there was a bustle or scuffle, commotion and hurry, scramble and stir.

Zacchaeus scrambled up and down from the sycamore tree.

The Sycomorus,  the fig-mulberry, having fig-like fruit and leaves like the mulberry. A strong tree with great branches, and are easily climbed. That a man of this chief publican’s dignity would have resorted to such a manoeuvrer suggests his foresight, energy, determination, and ingenuity.

Curiosity carried Zacchaeus to scramble up the tree , in haste he scrambled down the tree, being called by name was great reason to do so quickly, past the commotion, the love and invitation of Jesus brought him down and to his house. There he received his guest Jesus joyfully! This joy is significant and showing a previous yearning for this encounter.  The internal revolution of Zacchaeus was as perfect as instantaneous,  receiving the free and full forgiveness of his sins, a justifying righteousness, an abundance of grace.

I’m getting a few words and ideas here for us, for myself, this morning:
Curiosity, scrambling, excited commotion, invitation, being called by name, receiving in joy, forgiveness, abundance.

Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God. Beatitudes

This beatitude gets the heart of the matter, echoes and rings in my ears as I sit here contemplating this wonderful short story out of the life of Jesus.

As we scramble to the busy schedules of this week, let’s remember the joyful commotion of being met my Jesus in our homes and being called by His name!

Wishing you a wonderful start to this week.

Philemon

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reframing

Chapter 6

Good Monday Morning to this week 7 of 2020

Philippians 4:12 “I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want.

Reframing is a technique used in therapy to help create a different way of looking at a situation, person, or relationship by changing its meaning. Also referred to as cognitive reframing, it’s a strategy therapists often used to help clients look at situations from a slightly different perspective.

Reframing is seeing the current situation from a different perspective, which can be tremendously helpful in problem-solving, decision making and learning.

Reframing is helping you or another person to more constructively move on from a situation in which you or the other person feels stuck or confused.

The aim of reframing is to shift one’s perspective to be more empowered to act – and hopefully to learn at the same time.

Many times, merely reframing one’s perspective on a situation can also help people change how they feel about the situation, as well.

Many Christians today experience a frustrating and confusing disconnect between the story of Scripture and the story of their lives.

If  Jesus is the redeemer of all things, how does faith in him reframe every aspect of our lives? How does Christianity connect to the whole of who we are? Is Jesus relevant in an increasingly complex world? These are the types of questions many of us wrestle with today.

Think about the past week. Recall some of the different places, activities, and situations you were involved in. Where did you see your faith making a difference? Where did you feel his presence? Where did you not feel connected to him? If he feels uninvolved, it could be that the multifaceted dimensions of your life and the demands placed upon you are stealing your connection with Him?  And if that happens, is faith relegated to just another thing in we have to juggle.

How do we reframe?

Who am I, why am I here, what do I do? Where do I go, what’s important in life, what’s real and what’s an illusion; what’s true and what’s false,” and on and on. Jesus with the disciples on the road to Emmaus a good example of two followers that had lost sight of the true or the whole story. They were confused; blinded to seeing Jesus—in fact, they didn’t ever expect to see Jesus again. Did they forgot the part where Jesus said He would rise again on the third day or were they just deeply dissapointed? And so they desperately needed Jesus to once again open their minds to the true and whole story of what he accomplished. Luke 24.32 Passion Version:  Stunned, they looked at each other and said, “Why didn’t we recognize it was him? Didn’t our hearts burn with the flames of holy passion while we walked beside him? He unveiled for us such profound revelation from the Scriptures!”

The setting for many to find faith is in and through worship, which includes Scripture, proclamation, and sacrament as the breaking of the bread as the story then continues: Stay and have supper with us …  That is also where the faith of all is sustained. It is the place where Jesus continues to reveal himself. The Christian faith is born and nurtured where people share in worship through word, gesture, water, bread, wine, and mutual care, the smile, the clasp of another’s hand, perhaps even an embrace. It’s the Emmaus story for today,  one of movement, containing nine verbs describing movement. The two men “are going”, Jesus “came near and went with them”, they “came near”, Jesus “walked ahead of them”, “he went in to stay with them”, “he vanished from their sight”, and “they got up and returned”. Some of the verbs tell of movements made by Jesus; others tell of the two men. Either way, both Jesus and his followers are on the move. But it is not movement for its own sake. The moves being made have a purpose, one of fellowship (communion) with Jesus and others.

Where is your Emmaus Road this morning? What types of complexity and fragmentation characterize your life? Where is your personal reframing taking place?

Wishing you a blessed week!

Philemon

Unsheltered?

Chapter 5

Good Monday Morning to this week 6 of 2020

Six days later, three of them did see it. Jesus took Peter, James, and John and led them up a high mountain. His appearance changed from the inside out, right before their eyes. His clothes shimmered, glistening white, whiter then any bleach could make them. Elijah, along with Moses came into view in deep conversation with Jesus. Peter interrupted, “Rabbi, this is a great moment!. Le’ts build three shelters …
Mark 9: 2-5 MSG

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
will abide in the shadow of the Almighty. Ps 91

God is our refuge and strength,
a very present help in trouble .. Ps 45

In you oh Lord I have taken refuge .. Ps 31

There will be a shelter to give shade from the heat by day,
and refuge and protection from the storm and the rain. Is. 4.6

Let me dwell in Your tent forever;
Let me take refuge in the shelter of Your wings. Ps 61

shelter, a hut, a tent, a dwelling…  a basic architectural structure or building that provides protection from the local environment. Having a place of shelter, of safety and of retreat, i.e. a home, is commonly considered a fundamental physiological human need, the foundation from which to develop life. Equally significant is also the metaphorical shelter, beliefs, convictions, values and traditions.

Dallas Willard also refers to an “interior castle” of the human soul, a shelter with many rooms, and they are slowly occupied by God, allowing us time and room to grow.

Jesus born at a stable, temporary yet sufficient shelter for his birth, therefore He knows much of earthly shelters in his life, even more about the spiritual: In deep conversation with Elija and Moses he’s called out by Peter; “Rabbi, this is a great moment!. Le’ts build three shelters …

Just then a light-radiant cloud enveloped them and from deep within the cloud, a voice: “This is my Son, marked by my love, Listen to him!”

Did Jesus really have an unsheltered life? The cloud enveloped him, deep in conversation with Elija and Moses, he is engulfed, surrounded, covered, overshadowed by the presence of God, as the deeply affirming words are spoken: My Son, marked by my love!

The Almighty God, He Himself is the shelter, and in His shelter, He keeps us safe from danger and harm engulfing us with His presence.

The psalmist in Psalm 31 begins with the words,  in you, O Lord, I have sought refuge, this,  his portrayal of the role of Yahweh. The idea of taking refuge may well derive from the common experience of finding protection in the hills.  The verb denotes the confident seeking of security, rather than a flight of desperation. This communicates dependence on Yahweh as opposed to the trust in their own ability. The object of deep desire and refuge is emblematic of the person who places complete trust in God with taking cover in his shelter.

Safeguarded by the shelter of the Yahwe I wish you a blessed week!

Philemon

 

Letting go

Good Monday Morning to this last Monday of 2019

We’re about to let of go of 2019 … some thoughts to letting go.

Letting go is incredibly difficult. No matter if we cling to worries about the future, or if we keep replaying the mistakes of the past it can be quite challenging when you have difficulties to move on. The attempt to hold on to the things that were familiar to us can limit our capability to experience the present moment. Yet, life is all about continuous change, no matter how hard we try to keep things as they are, we will sooner or later be confronted with relentless changes, whether we like it or not, especially as we open ourselves to new possibilities.

In the Bible there are quite a lot of stories of letting-go:

Mary and Joseph are asked to let go of their son Jesus.
Jonah is asked to let go of his hatred for the Ninevites.
Sarah is saddened and angry, she lets go of Abraham.
Pharaoh is asked to let go of the Israelites.
Esau is asked to let go of his inheritance.
Saul is asked to let go of his throne and his power.
David is made to let go of his son he fathered with Bathsheba.
Paul is asked to let go of his prejudice and hatred.
Abraham is asked to let go of Isaac.

Story 1
Once upon a time, there were three men. Each man had two sacks, one tied in front of his neck and the other tied on his back. When the first man was asked what was in his sacks, he said, “In the sack on my back are all the good things friends and family have done. That way they’re hidden from view. In the front sack are all the bad things that have happened to me. Every now and then I stop, open the front sack, take the things out, examine them, and think about them.” Because he stopped so much to concentrate on all the bad stuff, he really didn’t make much progress in life.

The second man was asked about his sacks. He replied, “In the front sack are all the good things I’ve done. I like to see them, so quite often I take them out to show them off to people. The sack in the back? I keep all my mistakes in there and carry them all the time. Sure they’re heavy. They slow me down, but you know, for some reason, I can’t put them down.”

When the third man was asked about his sacks, he answered, “The sack in front is great. There I keep all the positive thoughts I have about people, all the blessings I’ve experienced, all the great things other people have done for me. The weight isn’t a problem. The sack is like sails of a ship. It keeps me going forward.

“The sack on my back is empty. There’s nothing in it. I cut a big hole in its bottom. In there I put all the bad things that I can think about myself or hear about others. They go in one end and out the other, so I’m not carrying around any extra weight at all.”
Source | H. Norman Wright, The Perfect Catch

What are you carrying in your sacks from 2019 as you journey and transition towards 2020?

Who do you identify with? The most sympathetic is the one who remembers all the blessings while acknowledging and letting go of negativity and judgment toward self and others?

If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.
Henry Ford

Sometimes the hardest part isn’t letting go but rather learning to start over.
Nicole Sobon

Story 2
Two monks were returning to the monastery in the evening. It had rained and there were puddles of water on the roadsides. At one place a woman was standing unable to walk across because of a puddle of water. The elder of the two monks went up to her lifted her and left her on the other side of the road, and continued his way to the monastery.

In the evening the younger monk came to the elder monk and said, “Sir, as monks, we cannot touch a woman.”

The elder monk answered, “yes, brother”.

Then the younger monk asks again, “but then Sir, how is that you lifted that woman on the roadside ?”

The elder monk smiled at him and told him ” I left her on the other side of the road, but you are still carrying her.”

Paul put it this way in Hebrews 12.1
So since we stand surrounded by all those who have gone before, an enormous cloud of witnesses, let us drop every extra weight, everything that clings to us and slackens our pace, and let us run with endurance the long race set before us.
We may feel alone, but we aren’t. We are surrounded by an army of witnesses. They have run the race of faith and finished well. It is now our turn. We stay focused on Jesus (a master in letting go), who designed and perfected our faith.

Wishing you a blessed transition and crossover from 2019 to 2020.

Philemon

 

 

When Jesus becomes King

Good Monday Morning to this week 52 of 2019

This morning many thoughts and ideas are out of the book to N.T. Wright, How God became King, as we launch into these next Christmas days, being drawn to the extraordinary events of the birth of Jesus.

Through the birth of Jesus to Mary and Joseph a powerful, mysterious presence of the God of Israel, the creator God, opened Israel’s story,  bringing it to its climax by doing a new thing, bringing the story of creation to its height by a new creation from the womb of the old. The birth of Jesus opens the door to the “Miracle”, the divine intervention “from outside” into this world.

Jesus was born to a very difficult and dark world under the rule of the Roman empire. Jesus was born in extraordinary situations, all the difficulties known all too well to the people of the time, also to Mary and Joseph.  Joseph had the role and responsibility to take care of a child that was not his own, yet full of obedience he took very best care of the child Jesus together with Mary. This plan of the almighty God to prepare the return of the King to live in this known world, in all its brokenness is a beautiful image of the path of Kingdom coming and returning. Jesus became King when He ascended to heaven and established the church. Before that time, Jesus promised and mentioned that the Kingdom was at hand. The first part of his life here on earth in the fullness of the time, the predicted age of the Roman Empire when God would establish His eternal kingdom.

Christmas offers us, not so much a different kind of human, but a different kind of God! A God who, having made humans in his own image, will most naturally express himself in and as that image-bearing person in Jesus.

If you belong to Jesus the Messiah,  if his Spirit dwells in you,  if you are a worshipper of the one true God, maker of heaven and earth then however you may feel at the moment, whether you are sick or healthy, successful or in trouble, you are simply a shadow of your future self. God intends to transform the “you” the you who you are at the moment into a being, a full, glorious, physical being who will be much more truly “you” than you’ve ever been before.

Jesus pointed to God in order to explain his actions as when he commanded the wind and the sea to be still and they obey him. Jesus himself the new temple, the true King, the true priest at the heart of the new creation, preparing that day when the whole earth shall and will be filled with the glory of God.

And so this temple, like the wilderness tabernacle, is a temple on the move, as Jesus’s people going out, in the energy of the Spirit, to be the dwelling of God in each place, in anticipation of the entire fulfillment of the Kingdom of Jesus.

God is also becoming King through you, the meek, the peacemakers, the heart pure people, the hungry for justice people, the people of a new identity.

When God wants to take his power and reign, putting the world to rights as he promised, he doesn’t send in the tanks, he sends in the meek the brokenhearted, the crushed in spirit, they will do in humility and hope, the world renewing tasks through which the living God is implementing His way of being King. His Kingdom project is launched in and through Jesus, the creator God began the new phase of his great world-changing project.

May you be filled with the wonder of Jesus the King being born, of the deep joy of Mary, the obedience of Joseph, the joy of the angels, the eagerness of the shepherds, the determination of the Wise Men,  as God becomes King through you in many renewing tasks, going out in the power with the Spirit of God the King living in you.

Philemon

Power of choice, a new liberty?

Good Monday Morning to this week 51 of 2019

This week I saw a very disturbing picture of many worship leaders gathering at the White House. The same people who write songs about Jesus are endorsing policies that are destroying the very people Jesus cares so much about like immigrants and refugees.

This took me to reading Romans 13. This chapter is one of those classic passages, used to make sure we are all being obedient citizens, which historically has led Christians into all kinds of problems:

“Everyone must submit himself to the governing authorities…” (Romans 13:1)

We live in times where dissent is more important than ever. All around the world we are witnessing the rise of the “strongman”  and brutal leaders. These are hard-line men that rule with an iron fist and with little regard for justice or the downtrodden.

Craig Greenfield took a closer look at this:

After Jesus’ death and resurrection, King Herod arrested some of the believers, including James and Peter, and put them on public trial. The night before the trial, an angel of the Lord woke Peter up, removed his chains, opened the prison doors and led him out the main gate of the prison.

Yet after escaping from jail, Peter went on to write:

“Submit yourselves for the Lord’s sake to every authority instituted among men: whether to the king, as the supreme authority, or to the governors, who are sent by him to punish those who do wrong and to commend those who do right. For it is God’s will that by doing good you should silence the ignorant talk of foolish men.”

Or when Paul was in Damascus, he escaped from a strongman city governor who was trying to arrest him …  after reaching safety, Paul wrote a surprising letter:

“Everyone must submit himself to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established.”

The key to understanding is in the word “submit”.  The Greek word hupo-tasso, which has been translated as “submit” or “be subject,” literally means to arrange stuff respectfully in an “orderly manner underneath”.

This simple meaning of “social orderliness” would have been understood by original readers, but it is a little obscured in our English translation.

This word is used in Ephesians 5:22 to encourage husbands and wives to submit to one another, and it reflects God’s concern for order and respect.

Here’s the main point – Paul and Peter believed that governing authorities are necessary for keeping the peace. God is a God of order – not anarchy or chaos.

But here’s where we go wrong. There’s ANOTHER word, hupo-kouo, which is best translated as “obey,” which literally means to conform, to follow a command, or to kowtow to an authority as a subordinate. wasn’t used by Peter and Paul, they chose not to.

Though Paul, Peter and other followers of Jesus deliberately disobeyed laws that were in conflict with God’s commands, they still submitted to the authorities by accepting the legal consequences of their actions.

As far back as the book of Exodus, the Hebrew midwives refused to carry out the Pharoah’s repugnant order to murder newborn babies.

Slavery was lawful. The holocaust was legal. Segregation and apartheid were legally sanctioned. Many of today’s laws are created to protect much “other” rather than people.

So does the law or does God dictate our ethics?

Could this be showing us another way to interpret Romans 13 as Peter and Paul meant? If we break an unjust law to highlight and protest its injustice, we should be willing to submit to the punishment for breaking such laws, so that we demonstrate our respect for the role of government, in general, no following a God of chaos, each doing whatever we want but a God of order and respect for one another and the governing authorities.

There are times when we, as followers of Christ, will be called upon to stand up with a holy ‘NO!’ in the face of evil and injustice.

This week I saw a preview of the film of the life of Franz Jagerstatter, a forgotten martyr, devout Catholic, telling the harrowing and heartbreaking true story of his life refusing to take the Hitler oath. During his military training in 1940, he notices the evil underlying the Nazi regime and arrives home dead-set on refusing to fight for the army in the future. He declared his refusal to fight when he was summoned back to the Linz barracks in 1943, where he was held in custody, transferred to Berlin-Tegel to await trial, and condemned to death for sedition.

Gregory Williams puts it this way:
The Greek word used in Romans 13 by Paul is exousia, which is defined: “power of choice, liberty of doing as one pleases.” It is translated “right” in Hebrews Revelations and it is even translated “liberty” in Paul’s own 1Corinthians 8:9.

In the original text of the Bible the translation of exousia as liberty or right would fit the context of scripture. One may translate it as power of choice. The Greek word exousia is considered to be one of the strongest words in the Greek language representing the idea of liberty. Accepting the idea that Romans 13 is actually a statement by Paul in support of individual liberty, rather than a command to submit to the commands of authoritarian rulers, will be difficult for some pastors and Christians alike to admit.

Romans 13 could be read as follows: “Let every soul be subject unto the higher liberty. For there is no liberty but of God: the liberties that be are ordained of God. Whosoever, therefore, resisteth the liberty, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation. For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the liberty? Do that which is good, and thou shalt have praise of the same.” Romans 13: 1,3

God desires that every man should have the unimpaired and divine right of choice as long as that choice does not violate the right of our neighbor to make his own choices. There is a distinction between the privileges of governments granted by the people and the rights of the people granted by God. We must not only care about the rights of others while exercising our own, but we must fulfill that obligation without infringing on the rights of our neighbor to make their own choices. To accomplish that mission prescribed by God we must discover the whole truth and provide for it.

From the beginning, our Creator has allowed that men have the power to choose to be free souls under God or go under the authority of other men and their gods. That choice is never without consequences.

As Christians, we not only profess Jesus as Lord but we follow him. We proclaim the Kingdom of God is here, just as he did. We don’t claim to be residents of earthly borders but of the kingdom that is within. Jesus is the only governing authority of this kingdom. To be disobedient and resist this authority is to not feed the hungry or give water to the thirsty or clothe the poor. It’s to not welcome the stranger into our home, our land. It’s to not forgive our enemies.

So what do we do when we see injustice within the governing authorities? Do we follow Jesus to feed the poor welcome the stranger and proclaim a different kingdom than the one the world system has drawn borders around and tries to keep people out of and say “the kingdom is within you, welcome”

In the upside-down kingdom where Jesus is Lord, the table is open to everyone.

Wishing you a wonderful week as you welcome this Jesus and his arrival to the world.

Philemon

 

 

Shared happiness tastes better!

Happiness quite unshared can scarcely be called happiness; it has no taste.
Charlotte Bronte

Good Monday Morning (now Tuesday) to this week 50 of 2019

Traveling home from Togo in West Africa yesterday, I spent my time in planes, trains and buses. Arriving safely late Monday evening I was reminded of my missing Monday Message and a little story of untasty food because of an interesting situation with a toddler.

Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you. Ephesians 4:32

On Sunday afternoon in Adido-Adin, I was drinking coffee spending some time with a toddler staying at the same place. This toddler enjoyed my company and was happy to share all with me and assumed I would do the same. When I didn’t share the hot coffee with her, she was greatly insulted and wouldn’t look at me anyhow. Actually, she was deeply hurt and tried to express that in many emotions to her mother. All of my reconciliation attempts failed for a very long time.

From time to time I tried other attempts, playing with toys, making a joke, offering a hand, a smile, all failed. As I then ordered lunch and started eating salad, this finally caught some attention, yet only very vaguely.

The happiness of my lunch and nice salad was quite unshared. A fork a knife and a spoon were with my plate. I finally took the fork put some corn onto it, took the spoon and put a few pieces of corn onto the spoon as well. Putting the spoon into the hand of the toddler she took the first bite, still not looking at me. The next spoon she refused, then returned to grab the spoon and take another load of corn and salad. Her hunger was long gone because she had her favorite lunch already. But sharing these colorful yellow corn pieces with me, eating with a spoon, seeing me do that the same, finally brought peace and reconciliation between the two of us.

Happiness shared can truely be called happiness; with the taste being so delicious!
warapunga

I wish you a wonderful week with the taste of happiness, forgiveness and reconciliation. 

Philemon

 

God says you fill his mind

Thoughts to make your heart sing.

Good Monday Morning to this week 49 of 2019

When you were little,  did someone big and strong carry you?

As I go through the day’s here in Togo, I see the “little ones” being carried in many ways. A wonderful moment is usually when the babies get uneasy, unhappy, though fed, it’s simply time to get some rest, and where best than on the back of the mother. Gently she wings the baby onto her back, positions the feet, wraps the towel carefully around and tightens it until the child is firmly secured. In no time the babies fall asleep. The message is clear, affirming, straightforward;  I can help, trust me, I’ll show you, let me get you firmly positioned and you’ll have a wonderful sleep.

God’s intention is very similar with his words, actions, His affection, His care and love for us. Are they really an option to fully trust? How we need this firm swing onto his back to realize that He is for us, that we are fully in His grip, that He is in charge and has got us tight “under His wings”.

I have posted watchmen on your walls, Jerusalem;
they will never be silent day or night. You who call on the Lord,
give yourselves no rest and give him no rest till he establishes Jerusalem
and makes her the praise of the earth

In other words: Take no rest, all you who pray to the Lord. Fill his mind, give him no rest!  Isaiah 62:6-7

Then you will call, and the Lord will answer; you will cry for help, and he will say: Here am I. Isaiah 58:9

And so we know and rely on the love God has for us.
God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them.
1 John 4:16

Those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength.
They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary,
they will walk and not be faint. Isaiah 40:31

And so we know and rely on the love that God has for us. 1 John 4.16

May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.

I’ve got your back!

But you will not leave in haste or go in flight;
for the Lord will go before you, the God of Israel will be your rear guard.

Like the child on the back of the mother, the mother can do many things while the child rests, but her mind is on the child, feels every move, feels the warmth, and reacts to the sleeping and awakening.

You fill God’s mind! 

In His grip! 

Philemon

Crossing the Jordan

I’ll cross over the Jordan someday. Jonny Cash

Good Monday Morning to this week 48 of 2019

This week the Jordan river came up in a few talks, in music with a live event, hearing of life-changing baptisms and in reading about the amazing story of  Eliyahu Ben-Shaul Cohen.

Last week we looked at times when our well runs dry and concluded with Faith, faith being one of the most vital keys to keeping your well, well-watered. So what is it like to stand on the shore of the Jordan? What does this phrase mean?

Crossing the Jordan ….

God made a promise to Abraham, Isaac and the Jewish people that their descendants would inherit a land given to them by God himself. Before Jacob died, the children of Israel found themselves living far away from that land.

Slavery, a handful of plagues, forty years in the wilderness added to the long story arriving at the shore of the Jordan.

Before Joshua could lead the people into the land flowing with milk and honey, an intimidating river had to be crossed – the flood stage of the Jordan River to be exact. By the grace and a miracle of God the people safely crossed the river, and by faith, they received a land that they had only heard of through a promise that had been made so long ago.

The river starts flowing on the slopes of Mount Hermon, on the border between Syria and Lebanon, and flows southward through northern Israel to the Sea of Galilee/ Tiberius. Exiting the sea, it continues south, dividing Israel and the Israeli-occupied West Bank to the west from Jordan to the east before emptying into the Dead Sea. The surface of the Dead Sea, at an elevation of about 430 meters below sea level the lowest land point on Earth.

The Jordan River is more than 360 km in length. After 1948 the river marked the frontier between Israel and Jordan from just south of the Sea of Galilee to the point where the Yābis River flows into it from the east. Since 1967, however, when Israeli forces occupied the West Bank, the Jordan has served as the cease-fire line as far south as the Dead Sea.

The Jordan Valley itself is not well watered. The Jordan is fed by rains falling on the neighboring plateaus; the waters then flow downward through rivers or wadis. The Jordan itself is shallow. Its high-water period lasts from January to March. The existence of thermal springs, in the Tiberias region give the Jordan’s waters a relatively high degree of salinity. The Jordan’s waters are of special importance for irrigation especially for several oases in the bordering foothills at Jericho permitting the cultivation of oranges, bananas, early vegetables, and sugar beets.

The Jordan River is the river that David crossed to escape Absalom’s rebellion. Elijah and Elisha crossed the Jordan River before Elijah gave his double portion of anointing upon Elijah and being taken by a whirlwind into heaven. The Jordan River baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist, perhaps the most popular biblical events at the river. This biblical event is one of the foundations of the Divine Trinity of God.

Joshua ordered the people to consecrate themselves, the next day, he assembled them a half-mile behind the ark of the covenant. He told the Levite priests to carry the ark to the Jordan River, which was swollen and treacherous, overflowing its banks with snowmelt from Mount Hermon. As soon as the priests waded in with the ark, the water stopped flowing and piled in a heap, 20 miles north near the village of Adam. It was also cut off to the south. While the priests waited with the ark in the middle of the river, the entire nation crossed over on dry ground. The Lord commanded Joshua to have 12 men, one from each of the 12 tribes, pick up a stone from the center of the riverbed. Once everyone had crossed, the priests with the ark came out of the riverbed. As soon as they were safe on dry land, the waters of the Jordan rushed in.

Israel learned important lessons from the miracle of crossing the Jordan River. First, God demonstrated that he was with Joshua as he had been with Moses. The ark of the covenant was God’s throne on earth. Literally, the Lord went into the dangerous river first, demonstrating his role as Israel’s protector.

When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and when you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you. When you walk through the fire, you will not be burned; the flames will not set you ablaze. Isaiah 43:2

God revealed that his wonder-working strength would enable the people to conquer the enemy they faced. Most of the year, the Jordan River was about 100 feet wide and only three to ten feet deep. However, when the Israelites crossed, it was at flood stage, overflowing its banks. The mighty hand of God parted it, made it safe for his people to cross with no other power overcoming God’s mighty power.

Crossing the Jordan – a breaking with the past for Israel.
When the manna stopped, the enemies needed to be overcome.
Crossing the Jordan – crossing to a new form of a spiritual life of freedom.
Crossing the Jordan – a transition and the begin of a new conquest. (for Joshua for sure)
Crossing the Jordan – a preparation for a new mantel,  again with a transition an a crossing on dry ground (also for Elijah and Elisha).
Crossing the Jordan – a place of new beginnings, not just the waters part, the heavens did as well.
Crossing the Jordan –  a place of personal conversions as in the cases of Rahab, Naaman, Zaccheus, and Bartimaeus.
Crossing the Jordan – requires leaving one shore and crossing the river for another.
Crossing the Jordan – entering a promise,  crossing over to new spiritual life.
Crossing the Jordan – the Grace of God leading you home.

Pick a stone from the Jordan river today:

Joshua placed a second set of stones in the river bed to be cover by the water when God removed His unseen hand holding the river back. Sometimes we are to build monuments in our hearts that only we know about monuments of anonymity in our hearts reminding us of God’s power and provisions.

Wishing you a good week “crossing the Jordan”! .. remember not to cross alone!

Philemon